Pushing Ice by Alastair Reynolds (2005) 460 p.

Pushing_Ice_cover_(Amazon)

In the year 2057 one of Saturn’s smaller moons, Janus, unexpectedly departs from its orbit and begins to accelerate out the solar system. Clearly no moon at all but rather an inexplicable alien artifact, the human race sends their only nearby ship scrambling after it: the comet miner Rockhopper, with a crew of about 150 under captain Bella Lind. They will have only five days to arrive at Janus and, if it doesn’t prove hostile, land on it and investigate it.

This is a great and simple set-up for a Big Dumb Object first contact mystery, clearly drawn from Arthur C. Clarke’s classic novel Rendezvous with Rama, in which a gargantuan but silent alien spacecraft enters the solar system with a trajectory that will slingshot it around the sun and send it back out again, leaving a human research mission with a limited amount of time to investigate it. The difference is that Pushing Ice goes far beyond the limits of a story like that, with the crew of the Rockhopper ending the story very, very far away – in terms of both time, distance, and situation – from where they started out. It’s a great book to go into cold, and Reynolds surprised me with where he took the story at every step of the way.

Pushing Ice has the usual flaws of any science fiction story, most notably in the thinness of characters – and in particular, the pivotal feud that develops between Bella and her second-in-command Svietlana, which has its origins in an understandable enough dispute but is dragged out over a ludicrous length of time and includes a shockingly long period of solitary confinement that I very much doubt would leave the victim with a sane mind, or which the other members of the crew would stand for. This is one of the more egregious examples demonstrating that Reynolds doesn’t have a particularly good grasp on how human beings relate to one another in real life, or at least isn’t very good at writing about it. But that’s no worse a sin than most sci-fi authors, and Pushing Ice is a gripping pageturner full of intriguing mysteries which kept me engaged all the way through, and stands alongside House of Suns as one of Reynolds’ best books.